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The Covenant Fund: time to get started

Contents
About the fund
The 3 priorities
Covenant Fund small grants
Covenant Fund large grants
Contact us
We’ve already told you that the Covenant Fund is coming (https://w w w .gov.uk/government/publications/covenantfund/
thecovenantfundiscoming),
well it’s nearly here. We don’t want to spring everything on you in one go though, so here is some
more information ahead of the formal launch on 13 August 2015.
About the fund
The Covenant Fund is one of many funds available through government, trusts, lottery distributers, European funding and
other sources. Its budget is not unlimited, and it won’t be possible to do everything we want to do with it straight away,
instead, we think it’s important to do a few things very well each year, and have a real impact in some specific areas of
need.
We have £10 million every year, and this year we are making funding available for:
1. community integration projects
2. the coordination and delivery of support to the armed forces community
3. projects which address issues facing veterans in the criminal justice system
Find out more about the 3 priorities (https://w w w .gov.uk/government/publications/covenantfund/
thecovenantfundtimetogetstarted#
the3priorities).
There will be 2 application routes:
small grants (https://w w w .gov.uk/government/publications/covenantfund/
thecovenantfundtimetogetstarted#
covenantfundsmallgrants)
for projects requiring up to £20,000
large grants (https://w w w .gov.uk/government/publications/covenantfund/
thecovenantfundtimetogetstarted#
covenantfundlargegrants)
for projects requiring between £20,001 and £500,000
The 3 priorities
1. Community integration projects
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What’s it about?
Under this priority we will fund projects which create strong local links between the armed forces and civilian communities;
which overcome barriers; and improve perceptions, attitudes and understanding.
Applying
We see community integration projects as being mainly smaller, one year grants that use the small grants
(https://w w w .gov.uk/government/publications/covenantfund/
thecovenantfundtimetogetstarted#
covenantfundsmallgrants)
route.
We will consider community integration projects requiring over £20,000 through the large grants
(https://w w w .gov.uk/government/publications/covenantfund/
thecovenantfundtimetogetstarted#
covenantfundlargegrants)
route,
but the project will have to be an exemplar of its kind though, showing a truly integrated approach and shared benefits for
the armed forces and civilians alike.
What are the main criteria?
Whilst we will fund a range of project activities, in many ways the approach to developing and delivering, then sustaining the
benefits of the project will be more important than the activities which are undertaken.
So we will prioritise projects which:
are locally rooted and driven
are jointly developed and delivered by armed forces and civilian partners
have lasting benefits for both civilians and armed forces communities
will be able to demonstrate real impact in overcoming barriers; and improving perceptions, attitudes and understanding.
We will consider both revenue and capital projects, as long as they clearly address the above criteria. We are keen to see
projects which link to the whole armed forces community, including families and exservice
personnel, and not just serving
personnel.
We would envisage that the majority of community integration projects apply through the small grants
(https://w w w .gov.uk/government/publications/covenantfund/
thecovenantfundtimetogetstarted#
covenantfundsmallgrants)
route
and are lead by either an armed forces charity or a local authority.
Who can apply?
The lead organisation can be either a registered charity or a statutory body, such as a local authority. If the application is not
lead by an armed forces charity, it must have an armed forces charity as a key partner. Other types of organisation can be
partners in applications. All project work must be done on a not for profit basis.
2. The coordination and delivery of support to the armed forces community
What’s it about?
By “the coordination and delivery of support” we mean a range of support (including financial, housing, mental and physical
health, employability and social support) for serving armed forces personnel, exservice
personnel, and their families.
We recognise the value of local schemes and acknowledge that some gap filling may be required, including smaller one
year projects which require under £20,000 and use the small grants (https://w w w .gov.uk/government/publications/covenantfund/
thecovenantfundtimetogetstarted#
covenantfundsmallgrants)
route. However, we think it is essential that we do not just
fund a proliferation of websites, dropin
centres and help lines, but rather focus on service provision that is wellpublicised,
accessible, joined up and endtoend.
We are especially interested in partnerships and portfolios of projects which work
together to create integrated pathways through this service provision and apply through the large grants
(https://w w w .gov.uk/government/publications/covenantfund/
thecovenantfundtimetogetstarted#
covenantfundlargegrants)
route.
We would expect the majority of coordination and delivery of support to the armed forces community projects to be funded
through the large grants route.
We are particularly keen to see applications from strong, meaningful partnerships and organisations that have a good track
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record of delivering similar strategic projects across regions and nationally.
What are the main criteria?
We primarily want to fund coordinated, endtoend
approaches towards advice and support, which means we want to see
organisations connecting to create joined up services and person centred pathways through those services. However, we
are also willing to fund new and imaginative approaches on a smaller scale. This includes replications, where projects take
something that has worked in a different location or sector and try it in a new place.
So we will prioritise projects which:
link person centred services into a seamless whole
can demonstrate through consultation and engagement that they have clearly identified their beneficiaries and
understand their needs
are well planned and will be effectively delivered
can deliver strategic solutions and measurable outcomes which will have lasting benefits for beneficiaries
The lead applicant must be able to show evidence of:
being well connected and working with relevant organisations
genuine and effective partnership working
a track record of successfully delivering large strategic projects
having a real understanding of the issues they are going to address and the area they work in.
Who can apply?
The lead organisation can be either a registered charity or a statutory body, such as a local authority. If the application is not
lead by an armed forces charity, it must have an armed forces charity as a key partner. Other types of organisation can be
partners in applications. All project work must be done on a not for profit basis.
3. Issues facing veterans in the criminal justice system
What’s it about?
Under “veterans in the criminal justice system” we are particularly keen to see projects which help provide a joined up
service to former members of the armed forces that come into contact with the police, courts and prisons.
We recognise the value of local schemes and acknowledge that some gap filling may be required, including smaller one
year projects which require under £20,000 and use the small grants (https://w w w .gov.uk/government/publications/covenantfund/
thecovenantfundtimetogetstarted#
covenantfundsmallgrants)
route. However, we think it is essential that we do not just
fund a proliferation of websites, dropin
centres and help lines, but rather focus on service provision that is wellpublicised,
accessible, joined up and endtoend.
We are especially interested in partnerships and portfolios of projects which work
together to create integrated pathways through this service provision and apply through the large grants
(https://w w w .gov.uk/government/publications/covenantfund/
thecovenantfundtimetogetstarted#
covenantfundlargegrants)
route.
We would expect the majority veterans in the criminal justice system projects to be funded through the large grants route.
We are particularly keen to see applications from strong, meaningful partnerships and organisations that have a good track
record of delivering similar strategic projects across regions and nationally.
What are the main criteria?
We primarily want to fund coordinated, endtoend
approaches towards advice and support, which means we want to see
organisations connecting to create joined up services and personcentred
pathways through those services. However, we
are also willing to fund new and imaginative approaches on a smaller scale. This includes replications, where projects take
something that has worked in a different location or sector and try it in a new place.
So we will prioritise projects which:
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thecovenantfundtimetogetstarted
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link person centred services into a seamless whole
can demonstrate through consultation and engagement that they have clearly identified their beneficiaries and
understand their needs
are well planned and will be effectively delivered
can deliver strategic solutions and measurable outcomes which will have lasting benefits for beneficiaries
The lead applicant must be able to show evidence of:
being well connected and working with relevant organisations
genuine and effective partnership working
a track record of successfully delivering large strategic projects
having a real understanding of the issues they are going to address and the area they work in.
Who can apply?
The lead organisation can be either a registered charity or a statutory body, such as a local authority. If the application is not
lead by an armed forces charity, it must have an armed forces charity as a key partner. Other types of organisation can be
partners in applications. All project work must be done on a not for profit basis.
Covenant Fund small grants
When?
The small grants programme will be a single stage process with a short application form. The key dates you need to know
are:
Round 1 Round 2
Open for applications 13 August 2015 28 October 2015
Closing date 17 September 2015 17 December 2015
Decisions by 26 November 2015 10 March 2016
How much?
One off funding of between £1,000 and £20,000 are available, for projects lasting up to 12 months.
Covenant Fund large grants
When?
The key dates you need to know are:
Open for expressions of interest 13 August
Closing date for expressions of interest 24 September
Expression of interest decisions communicated, and invitations to stage 2 sent out, by 26 November 2015
Deadline for stage 2 applications 13 January 2016
Stage 2 decisions communicated by 10 March 2016
How much?
Grants of up to £500,000 are available, for projects lasting up to three years. For applications requesting over £300,000
however, applicants must consult with us before applying. The project will have to be an exemplar of its kind to be awarded
more than £300,000, with excellent coverage, delivery and impact.
Contact us
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https:/

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